Name

The name of the Lord is a strong tower; The righteous runs to it and is safe and set on high [far above evil] (Proverbs 18:10, AMP).”

The name of the LORD… What’s in a name? The Reformation Study Bible’s commentary on Proverbs 18:10, informed me that, “In Hebrew culture, a name was not a mere label, but usually an expression of the character of a person. God’s covenant name, ‘LORD,’ is associated with His character as Savior of His people …).

The name of the LORD is… He never changes and His names that represent His character never change.

The name of the LORD is a strong tower … The Reformation Study Bible also notes, “The security of the righteous is based on God’s character as a faithful Savior.”

“The name of the Lord is a strong tower; The righteous runs to it and is safe and set on high [far above evil] (Proverbs 18:10, AMP).”

“I bow before your holy Temple as I worship. I praise your name for your unfailing love and faithfulness; for your promises are backed by all the honor of your name (Psalm 138:2, NLT).”

” You are my hiding place; You, Lord, protect me from trouble; You surround me with songs and shouts of deliverance. Selah (Psalm 32:7, AMP).”

I am joining (on a Sunday) the Five Minute Friday writing community, hosted by Kate Motaung, for our weekly writing adventure. Please click here to learn about Five Minute Friday. This week’s prompt is, “Name.” The video of the hymn, “A Mighty Fortress is Our God,” was added was added after 5 minutes were completed.


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Culture

Salt is a preservative and a flavor enhancer. Believers are designed by God to be salt (Matthew 5:13).

Salt is still salt and serves the same functions regardless of it is stored in fine crystal or an inexpensive plastic container. Salt, however, can lose its saltiness and with the loss, its effectiveness. The same is true for believers and a cause of this loss is adopting the culture of the world rather than adapting to it. The Apostle Paul noted, “I became ‘weak’ to the weak to win the weak. I have adapted to the culture of every place I’ve gone so that I could more easily win people to Christ” (1 Corinthians 9:22, TPT). He adapted to the culture of the people to whom he was ministering but he did not allow that culture to change his beliefs, values, and purpose. May God help us to do the same.

I am joining (on Memorial Day) the Five Minute Friday writing community, hosted by Kate Motaung, for our weekly writing adventure. Please click here to learn about Five Minute Friday. This week’s prompt is, “Culture.”

May we both remember and honor those who answered the call to service and for doing so, paid the ultimate price.


Five Minute Friday: Promise

“But you promised!” The words are often a wail fueled by disappointment when a promise made to a child is not kept. And no amount of explanation, at least in the immediate aftermath, is consolation enough.

I am a child, although a grown woman. I am God’s child but He expects me to handle disappointments with maturity. Not respond with the uncontrolled outbursts of anger and frustration reminiscent of the tantrum of a 2-year old, but with the grace He gives. And the knowledge that every promise He has made is, “Yes and amen,” in Christ Jesus, but I do not set the timetable for the fulfilment of those promises. The timing is His and His alone. After all, He is sovereign and can be counted on to do all things well, always.

I am joining the Five Minute Friday writing community, hosted by Kate Motaung, for our weekly writing adventure. To learn about Five Minute Friday, click here. This week’s prompt is “Promise.”

Practice

“Give thanks in everything, for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus (1 Thessalonians 5:18).” It is not our natural inclination to give thanks. We have to practice doing so. One definition of practice is, “To perform or work at repeatedly so as to become proficient.” We have to develop the practice of giving thanks to God in all circumstances. This practice requires several things, among them the recognition that giving thanks is an act of obedience. An act of obedience which, like everything else God asks us to do, He provides sufficient grace for us to accomplish. Giving thanks to God in the good times stems from the awareness that God is the source of all good gifts (James 1:17). Giving thanks in difficult times, stems from the belief that He is sovereign and works all things together for the good of those who love Him and are called according to His purpose. Oh that we would practice giving thanks so that we can become proficient at doing so.

I am joining the Five Minute Friday writing community, hosted by Kate Motaung, for our weekly writing adventure. Please click here to learn about Five Minute Friday. This week’s prompt is, “Practice.” The definition of “Practice” used in this post is from merriam-webster.com. The benefits of being grateful and expressing thanks are well researched and documented. Should anyone be more given to gratitude than the children of God? One of my favorite resources for developing the practice of giving thanks to God in all circumstances is Ann Voskamp’s book, One Thousand Gifts: A Dare to Live Fully Right Where You Are. An additional resource is the website http://onethousandgifts.com/ where visitors are invited to share the things (gifts) for which they are thankful.

Opportunity

I can bewail missed opportunities.

Be stuck on what could have been.

Or begin looking for and make use of the opportunities God has woven into each new day.

Opportunities to begin again.

Chose life.

Choose Him

Extend grace.

Receive grace.

Draw closer to Him.

Overlook an offense.

Talk with Him.

Listen to Him.

Listen to others.

Love.

Forgive.

Learn.

Notice His goodness.

Give thanks…

I can bewail missed opportunities.

Be stuck on what could have been.

Or make use of the new ones God gives each day.

I am joining (on a Wednesday day) the Five Minute Friday writing community, hosted by Kate Motaung, for our weekly writing adventure. Please click here to learn about Five Minute Friday. The prompt is, “Oppprtunity.”

Touch

He is the Word by whom all things were created.

God wrapped in human flesh.

We know that He could heal only with His spoken word.

As demonstrated with the nobleman’s son (John 4:46-54).

And the centurion’s servant (Luke 7:1-10).

And the widow’s son (Luke 7:11-17).

He even raised Lazarus from the dead by His spoken word.

But there also were times when He chose to heal by His words and His touch.

As happened when he healed a man with leprosy.

The Bible does not tell us how long the man had been afflicted with leprosy.

But we know that the law required him to be an outcast.

And it was possible he had not felt the touch of a human hand in years.

If this was true, how wonderful it was that the first hand that touched him was the hand of the One who made him whole// (Matthew 8:1-4).

I am joining (on a Monday) the Five Minute Friday writing community, hosted by Kate Motaung, for our weekly writing adventure. Please click here to learn about Five Minute Friday. The prompt is, “Touch.” The content behind the // was added after 5 minutes were completed.

Saturdays

For Jesus’ disciples, what we now call Good Friday was a horrible, awful day, and the Saturday after, which can be considered the “in-between” day, was not any better. On that day, they woke up to the reality that Jesus was dead. You know how it is… something terrible happens one day, you go to bed, and in the few seconds just after you wake up the following day, all may seem well again … just like a regular day. You may even stretch, then the reality of the loss or whatever made the previous day very difficult, even traumatic, hits you again and you feel the wrenching pain, the loss, the despair as if you are experiencing the loss for the first time.

Good Friday was the worst day of the lives of His disciples and all who loved Jesus, and Saturday must not have been much better.

For us on this side of the Cross, Saturday, the “in-between” day, between Good Friday and Resurrection Sunday, is different. It is filled with anticipation because we know what they did not know on their “in between” Saturday … We know Sunday, Resurrection Day came! HE AROSE! Yes! Yes! Yes! We anticipate attending church, the anthems of worship and exultation, hearing the Word read once more, celebrating His resurrection with family and/or friends. But, like them, we all have our “Saturdays,” those “in-between” days or seasons when the only thing that looms, dominates our thoughts, is the “Friday,” that is, the loss, the heartbreak, the betrayal, the rejection, whatever devastated us. On our “Saturdays,” we do not know what will happen. We can be unsure if we will survive what we experienced.

On our personal “Saturdays,” it is essential that we remember, it is an “in-between” day or season. Sunday is coming. It always comes for the child of God. Death, whether it is of a person, a dream, a relationship, is never designed by our Father to be our final dwelling place. We really can still say, even with the snot running from our noses, our eyes red from weeping with tears still flowing, through the hiccups and exhaustion, “Sunday is coming. Sunday is coming.”

At first we may only be able to whisper this truth but we need to hear ourselves say it. Even if there is some doubt. We are not being delusional when we do so because our Father has promised “Saturday” is not all there is and will be. Say it as much as you need to until the truth changes your perspective and, if necessary, restores your hope, strengthens your faith. Sunday is coming! As it was for Jesus, there is a resurrection day in store for you.

Note: The original version of this post was first published in 2011.